SouthLake Christian Academy Update – September 2022

Dear SouthLake Christian Families,

As we head into Labor Day weekend, I am grateful to you for a remarkably smooth and peaceful start to the academic year. I know the first few weeks of school can be stressful as you learn new teachers, schedules, technologies, and logistics. Whenever you run into difficulty, our administrative team is here to help so don’t hesitate to reach out to us. If you aren’t sure who to contact, let me know and I’ll point you in the right direction.

Moms in Prayer
Beginning September 8, Moms in Prayer will meet on the second and fourth Thursday morning of each month to spend an hour praying for SouthLake students, faculty, and administration. Moms in Prayer is an international, Christ Centered, interdenominational prayer ministry made up of moms and grandmothers who desire to pray for children in schools. Moms in Prayer will meet at The Gathering Place, the house located adjacent to campus behind our large playground. You may park along the gravel drive leading to the house. If you have any questions, please email Jeanie Mason at jeaniemason7@gmail.com

Parents Bible Study
Beginning September 9, and each Friday morning this semester, we will host a Bible study for parents in the First Building Sanctuary at 8:00 AM. SouthLake Church Pastor Dan King and I will share leadership responsibilities. If you’ve ever wondered what your students are learning in Bible class and chapel, or if you have not found a church in the area, we invite you to join us. We know many of you work so we will keep our meeting time to 30 minutes.

Picture Day
Picture Day will be Thursday, September 8 for grades JK-4, and Friday September 9 for grades 5-11. These pictures will appear on ID cards and in our yearbook, and proofs will be available online for parents who may wish to purchase prints, holiday cards, banners, etc. Please be sure your children are in full dress uniform on the appropriate day. For more information about full dress uniforms, see our website under the Campus Life tab, under School Uniforms. In the event of inclement weather, we will reschedule picture day and notify you by text alert.

Carline
Rule number one for carline – don’t change lanes. We double stack our carline to minimize congestion on the main road, and we move each line forward in the order cars arrive. Changing lanes disrupts the process and usually means you wait longer. You should feel no pressure to arrive early for carline. Typically carline takes less than 10 minutes if you arrive at the designated time. If you arrive excessively early, the process takes you longer and you may get mixed in with traffic from an earlier dismissal. It may seem confusing when you see an adjacent line moving while you’re sitting still, but trust the process. There is a method to the madness.

That’s all for now.

Blessings,

Matthew S. Kerlin, Ph.D.
Head of School
SouthLake Christian Academy

Bible Prayer

SouthLake Christian Academy Update – August 2022

Dear SouthLake Christian Families,

Summer is winding down. Students return to campus in 10 days. People often ask if we are ready. My answer is always “No, but we will be.” As we prepare to begin a new academic year, you will likely be bombarded with information. I will try not to add to your burden, but do want to highlight a few details.

Open House/Orientation
We look forward to having you on campus next week for open house or orientation meetings. For those in grades JK-4, we will announce classroom teachers later this week and you will meet in your teacher’s classroom. For everyone else, we will direct you to the correct location when you arrive on campus, or notify you by text alert. We are finishing renovations in the First Building so some locations are still TBD. Here is the schedule:

  • JK-4 – Monday August 8, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
  • Grade 5 – Monday August 8, 9:00 a.m.
  • Grade 6 – Monday August 8, 10:30 a.m.
  • Grade 7 – Tuesday August 9, 9:00 a.m.
  • Grade 8 – Tuesday August 9, 10:30 a.m.
  • Grade 9 and all new High School students – Tuesday August 9, 1:00 p.m.

Normal Operations
For the first time since 2019, we begin the school year with mostly normal operations. Yes, COVID infections remain somewhat common, but decreased virulence from current strains of the virus mean we are mask optional and will not have to quarantine those exposed to COVID. If you have symptoms, however, it is important to stay home and test. Those with a positive COVID test will coordinate return to school with Nurse Elizabeth Metzger. Even though now most appear to experience mild symptoms from COVID, we still want to minimize spread and decrease student and teacher absences to the greatest degree possible.

Academic Development Center (ADC)
SouthLake provides robust services for students with specialized learning needs. Students needing academic accommodations of any kind, or specialized therapy from one of our certified NILD teachers, will have interaction with the ADC. This year Mrs. Iva Bas assumes the role of ADC Director, bringing a wealth of knowledge, experience, and compassion to the position. Those currently receiving services from the ADC will communicate with her to arrange schedules. Those needing academic accommodations based on professional testing will also communicate with her in the days to come. Support for students with learning differences is one of the things we do well here at SouthLake and we are thankful for Iva Bas, Gail Woods, Lynn Moore, and April Belcher for their work in this arena.

SouthLake App
Last month we introduced you to the SouthLake app. We know many have still not downloaded the app. In the days to come, we will rely heavily on this tool for communication, so please take a moment to download the SouthLake App which is available by name in the App Store (iOS users), or the Google Play Store (Android users). The app can connect you to school calendars, announcements, financial information, grades, homework, lunch orders, and everything you need to be an active member of the SouthLake community. We are still building content for some features of the app, and some features require login credentials for Renweb or Orgs Online.

Paul’s Letter to the Ephesians
This fall, in Middle and High School Chapel, we will be teaching through the New Testament book of Ephesians. In this letter, Paul reasons that because we are one in Christ, we should evidence a unity that transcends whatever might divide us. In the beginning of chapter 4, Paul urges us to walk in a manner worthy of our calling “with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love, eager to maintain the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace.” In the midst of contentious times, this is my prayer for SouthLake.

A Few Miscellaneous Details
A quick reminder that we will begin a new Bible study for parents when the First Building sanctuary is finished. Also, we are hiring a new School Counselor, and in cooperation with SouthLake Church, an Assistant Pastor/Spiritual Life Director. If you know of qualified candidates, direct them to our website. We will begin the school year with nearly 630 students. At 18 students per classroom, full capacity is 634. Ever so close.

I pray you have a great start to the school year.

Onward,

Matthew S. Kerlin, Ph.D.
Head of School
SouthLake Christian Academy

Academics Bible Education Leadership

Racial Violence in America

Dear SouthLake Christian Family,

We have spent the past few months together coping with the impact of the coronavirus. As we begin to celebrate the end of the semester and enjoy the summer, we now face once again the tragic specter racial violence in America. Today I grieve with you, and in particular with people of color in the SouthLake community, over the sin of racism and its deadly consequences. Recent events, including the Amy Cooper video in Central Park and the horrific deaths of Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd, serve as dreadful reminders that racial injustice is rooted deeply in our nation’s history and continues to plague our communities.

Let me say unequivocally that racism and racial inequality are contrary to the Gospel of Jesus Christ upon which SouthLake was founded. From cover to cover, the Bible speaks clearly on matters of human dignity and justice. All people are created in God’s image and we are called to love each other as we love ourselves. The priests and prophets of the Old Testament implored God’s people to do justice, love kindness, and walk humbly with God. Jesus Christ modeled love of neighbor, showing compassion to the marginalized and speaking truth to those in power, even asking God to forgive those who unjustly took his life. In the closing pages of Scripture, we see a glimpse of the end of history, when people from every nation, tribe, people, and language will stand together in unified worship and reverence before God. As a Christian school, we must denounce unjust systems and behaviors not because it is the fashionable or politically correct thing to do, but because it is right thing to do.

I thank God for the community leaders, teachers, and first responders whose jobs have been unimaginably difficult in recent days. I pray that together we would lead in ways consistent with the mandates of Scripture and the best ideals of our nation. As SouthLake’s Head of School, I pray for God’s wisdom to lead in ways that honor the image of God in each of you while seeing the sin and brokenness in myself. I ask that all members of the SouthLake Christian family pray, reflect, and seek ways to create a more just and equitable school, community, and nation.

In Christ,

Matthew S. Kerlin, Head of School

Bible Race

The Bible is Strange

Perhaps like a few of you, one of my New Year’s resolutions was to read the Bible through in 2015. I’ve read the Bible in its entirety, but I’ve never done it all in one year. My plan consists of reading 3-4 chapters of the Old Testament and 1 chapter of the New Testament each day. I’m only on day 8 of this project and I am increasingly convinced of one thing: the Bible is REALLY weird.

Let me say that I am an academically trained theologian. I have more than 30 graduate credits in biblical studies. I have taken classes in biblical interpretation, biblical history, and multiples classes on biblical languages, including 2 years of Hebrew and 3 years of Greek. I am not only a student of the Bible, but I have taught the Bible in a collegiate environment for over 20 years. All of that knowledge and experience with the Bible, and I still think the Bible is weird.

Here are just a few examples from my reading in Genesis so far this year:

  • Genesis 1: Both light and plants are created before the sun is created. There are also mornings and evenings before the sun exists. (I’m no scientist, but I can’t figure out how this works.)
  • Genesis 3: A talking animal tempts Eve. (And this is not a hallucination.)
  • Genesis 5: People live to hundreds of years of age and father children at those ages. (I’m now too exhausted to handle a newborn and I’m only in my 40s.)
  • Genesis 6: The “sons of God” mate with human wives and have offspring who are giants. (I don’t even know what to say about this.)
  • Genesis 6-9: Noah gathers 2 of every living thing into a boat to survive a flood. (Imagine the smell!)
  • Genesis 17: God tells Abram to cut off his foreskin. (If you don’t think this is weird, then you should Google “foreskin.” On second thought, don’t do that.)

I have only read about 25 pages so far, and yet I can’t fully explain half of what I’m reading. I’m a scholar, so I’m familiar with literary devices, metaphors, and symbols. I know about context and history and imagery. I get languages and translation. But I must still be honest – the Bible is weird.

And I like it that way. I wouldn’t have it any other way. When I read it carefully and intentionally, as if I’m reading it for the first time, I am fascinated. Sometimes it’s a page-turner filled with intrigue and scandal. Sometimes it can be rather boring with long lists of names or long-lost locations or ancient nations. Sometimes it can be spiritually revolutionary. Sometimes I read it, and sometimes it reads me. And always it guides me, willingly or not, toward the path intended by the One who inspired it. So I will continue to read this weird book, hopefully in its entirety in 2015. Why don’t you give it a try?

Bible

7 Important Things You Need to Know To Better Understand the Bible

I will admit that preachers and teachers can sometimes complicate biblical interpretation. I can understand the sentiment behind the statement “the Bible just means what it says.” Some academic approaches to biblical analysis can obscure the straightforward meaning of a text. But that doesn’t mean that the Bible is a simple book every part of which is easily accessible at first glance. The Bible is literature, after all, and that means there are some analytical tools that can help elucidate its meaning and prevent you from making it say whatever you want it to say.  Here are 7 things that in my estimation are essential for a better understanding of the Bible, one that gets as close as possible to the meaning that its authors intended when they wrote it, and one that prevents ideology and opinion from distorting its message. It will be evident as you read that I hold a high view of scripture and believe it to be the inspired word of God that we should use as an authority for the life and practice of faith, but I will steer clear of arguments about inerrancy and the historical or scientific nature of biblical texts. My purpose here is to help the average student of the Bible make reasonable sense out of what he or she reads.

1. Find a good translation of the Bible. The Bible was not written in English. It was written in Hebrew and Greek, with a little Aramaic thrown in the mix. This means that unless you know these languages, somebody has to translate the Bible for you to read it. Here’s the thing – not all translations are equal in accuracy or readability. Some are more literal, and often more difficult to read, while others are less literal and more readable, but potentially less accurate. Some translations are done by individuals and others by committees. All translators have an agenda, a theological perspective that they bring to the translation process that affects how they translate certain texts. In other words, all translation is simultaneously interpretation. Anyone who’s studied a foreign language knows this to be true. With this in mind, I suggest that you use multiple translations for reading, but select one for study purposes that is translated by a committee with as little a theological agenda as possible. In my opinion, the NIV is perhaps the best for casual reading, and the NRSV and ESV are two accurate, reasonably literal translations appropriate for study.

2. Understand the genre of the text you are reading. Not every book of the Bible should be read in the same way. You don’t read Genesis the same way you read Malachi. Matthew and Revelation require entirely different sets of interpretative skills. A flat reading of scripture, one that approaches the narrative texts, wisdom literature, prophets, Gospels, epistles, and apocalyptic texts all in the same manner is inevitably going to miss or distort the message. Learn the particularities of each genre in scripture and be aware of those traits as you read and study. A simple book like How To Read The Bible For All It’s Worth (Fee and Stuart) can help you identify the basic types of literature found in the Bible and give you some simple pointers for how best to understand that literature. After all, we don’t read Harry Potter the same way we read Shakespeare, and Freakanomics is a fundamentally different kind of book than The Hunger Games. We are familiar with these types of literature because they are part of our culture. The biblical texts were written and shaped within a culture that we are not likely to understand without some education.

3. Don’t miss the forest for the trees. Chapter and verse divisions, as helpful as they are, were not put into the text by the authors themselves, but added by later editors to facilitate Bible study. The negative consequence of their addition is that we tend to dissect the text and miss larger contexts and themes. We read verses rather than books, and our microscopic view of meaning becomes a cheap substitute for a broader comprehension of the narrative and its message. In other words, we may know Bible stories (Adam, Noah, Moses, David, Elijah, etc.) while missing the Bible’s story – the redemption of humankind. Read the books of the Bible the way they were meant to be read (or heard). Read them in their entirety, in one sitting, from start to finish. Only when you’ve got a sense of the overall narrative flow of a book are you ready to break it down into its constituent parts. And only when you’ve read the Bible itself broadly to see how the books are arranged and for what reasons, are you ready to comprehend how an individual book functions in the overarching drama of scripture.

4. Do your best to determine the author’s intended meaning. To determine what a text means you should begin by doing your best to determine what the text meant. I would not argue that a text can only mean for us what it meant for its original audience, but I do think that authorial intent is a responsible place to begin. Of course we cannot always know with certainty what the author intended a text to mean, but that doesn’t excuse us from trying to figure it out. The author’s intended meaning is an important limit on meaning; it keeps us from making the Bible say whatever we want it to say.

5. Learn context. Determining authorial intent can be challenging with even the most straightforward texts. Without context, you aren’t likely to understand the intended meaning. The historical, social, literary, or cultural context of a passage can have a dramatic impact on your interpretation. Knowing as much as possible about the world of the author, his or her language, customs, beliefs, values, etc., is of great value for making decisions about meaning. There are quality, affordable tools readily available to most anyone who wants to learn more about the world of the author, including Bible dictionaries, commentaries, language grammars, lexicons, Study-Bible notes, and a plethora of apps and online resources. As you use these tools over the years, you begin to learn enough basic context to help you even when the tools are not readily available.

6. Learn the difference between description and prescription. A description tells us what happened, while a prescription tells us what we should do. Often the Bible tells us what happened, not what should have happened or what should happen for all time and history. For example, the narrative texts of the Old Testament tell the story of people who are not necessarily role models to emulate, but rather fallible people who God chose to use to accomplish his purposes at a unique point in history. Similarly, the narratives of Acts tell us how early Christ-followers sought to navigate the complexities of becoming the Church in a culture increasingly hostile to Christian faith. There are lessons there for us in the description, but not necessarily hard-and-fast rules that should apply in every context. Clearly, the Bible contains prescription (the Ten Commandments, the teachings of Christ, etc.), but sometimes epistles give us opinion, as in 1 Corinthians 7.12 where Paul writes “To the rest I say this (not Christ but I) ….” Distinguishing between the two can sometimes be tricky, so we should take care with interpretation and extend grace to those who disagree.

7. The argument from silence is a weak foundation for belief or behavior. The Bible can sometimes be frustratingly silent on topics that we might find important. You will occasionally hear someone argue that since the Bible doesn’t speak about a topic, or because Jesus didn’t say anything about the issue, then we are free to choose as we wish how to believe or behave with regard to that issue. This amounts to an argument from silence – drawing conclusions based on the absence of statements in a text rather their presence. This is a commonly used but incredibly weak technique for establishing the legitimacy of a belief or practice. The Bible is not meant to be a systematic theology text. The Bible is a collection of occasional texts, documents written to address a particular historical context, difficulty, or question. As such, the Bible doesn’t always answer the questions we ask, and it often answers questions we aren’t asking. In some instances, you can extrapolate from what the Bible does say to make an educated guess about what it doesn’t. But this will be a guess, so be humble about your guesses. If you find yourself asking questions that the text isn’t, maybe you should be asking a different set of questions.

Bible Biblical Interpretation

The Meaning of Christian Faith as Simply as I Know How to Explain It

God created all things and called the world that he created “very good.” Man and woman, happy and in perfect relationship with the creation and the Creator. Tempted by the desire to be like God, man and woman rebelled against God and sin entered the world. Every evil, every ounce of suffering, every war and death and disease and disaster originates from a good creation that is broken by sin. 

In response, God chooses the nation of Israel to use for his purposes to begin to restore the world. He taught Israel how to live as his chosen people, set them free from captivity, provided for their needs and gave them the law (10 Commandments, and a few others). But the law that was a gift was also a curse. The law exposes how truly broken we are. This was God’s plan all along, to teach us that we cannot be good enough to fix the world, to be genuinely happy again, or to restore a perfect relationship with God. The prophets, priests, and kings of Ancient Israel teach us that in the pages of the Old Testament.

Enter Jesus. He was an Israelite, the next step in God’s plan through Israel to remake the creation. He was born, lived, and died as a human being. But he was also God, the Son of God, the incarnation of God, the fullness of God in a human being. He was tempted like us, laughed like us, hurt like us, cried like us, bled like us, but without sin, without fault. So when he was executed he didn’t deserve it. He sacrificed himself for us, and in some mysterious way that I cannot fully understand, he took upon himself the sin and pain and misery of the world in order to fix it. There was a debt I owed that he paid. I was captive to an old life and he set me free. I deserved a punishment that he took in my place. The God of the universe is so just that he could not ignore sin, and so filled with love that he could not let it destroy us. So God sent Jesus to fix the problem. And Jesus did, and is continuing to do so, and will one day complete that task for good at the end of time, at the end of the world as we know it. In the words of Andrew Peterson, the world was good, the world is fallen, the world will be redeemed.

What does this mean for us? We cannot fix ourselves. We cannot manage our own spiritual lives. We cannot restore ourselves or the world to the good condition in which God created it. We need Jesus. And the good news is this, literally the Gospel is this, that Jesus invites us to follow him, to believe in him, to trust him with our lives. And if we do so, he saves us from all that is wrong with us and from all that is wrong with the world. He restores us to a right relationship with God and with other people, gives us companionship, meaning and purpose in the Church, and begins the process of fixing everything. We do nothing to earn what God gives – this is grace, all of God offered to us in Christ. We acknowledge our sin and accept God’s gift, with the faith that God is who the Bible says he is, and that Jesus did what the Bible says he did for us. We enter a new relationship with him. All things become new.

– Presented at Freshmen Retreat, Samford University, August 29, 2014 and Shades Mountain Baptist UMin, August 31, 2014

Bible Biblical Interpretation Theology