I took my first campus ministry job in 1990, so this year marks my 24th year working with college students. Through the years I’ve completed a few degrees, attended dozens of conferences, read countless books, and learned through trial and error. These are all valuable and necessary parts of the learning process, but there’s one way to get better at your job that is available to anyone and costs almost nothing – peer review. Identify the people who do what you do well and learn from them. Here are a few ways to do that:

1. Do an website audit. Find 2-3 schools or organizations that you want to learn about, and spend 20 minutes on their website. Take notes. Learn the nuts and bolts of how their organizations work as well as the unusual or creative things they do. You can even assign an assistant or intern to do this for you and compile the information into a brief report.

2. Conduct a phone interview. I occasionally teach a campus ministry class at Beeson Divinity School and I assign students a final project that requires them to choose an organization and learn everything they can about it. They search the web and then make phone calls to leaders, volunteers, and participants in the organization. The interviews usually add something important to what they learn online.

3. Visit other organization’s meetings. Identify the 2-3 most successful campus ministries on your campus or in your city and visit them. If you’re older (like me) you may stand out in a crowd so it’s probably better to get a few insightful students to make the visits and then debrief with them over lunch (that you provide). Ask them what they liked and disliked about the meeting, the people, the leaders, the culture, the content, etc.

4. Visit other campuses. Several times in my career I’ve visited campuses far away from my own to learn all that I could about ministry organizations as well as the campuses themselves. I’ve tried to time the visits so that I could visit a weekly meeting, have lunch with student leaders, meet with the folks in charge, both campus ministry leaders and university administrators. I compile a list of questions in advance. I try to meet with as many organizations/schools as possible in a region to make the most of my time. I take copious notes. I review the notes periodically to solidify the learning.

2014-01-13 16.26.36

The view of the Pacific from Pepperdine University, where my staff and I visited this past January for a peer review.

5. Attend or plan information gatherings of leaders. Several gatherings of this sort already exist across the country, campus ministry leaders who get together in a city for 2-3 days to learn from one another. The cost is free to attend so all you have to pay for is travel, food, and lodging. If there isn’t one near you, plan one. Each fall and spring the campus ministers and college ministers in my city meet together to eat, exchange ideas and pray for one another.

6. Network via social media. Compared to other areas of ministry and service, there is precious little published about campus ministry or college ministry. I suspect that there is now more information about these areas of ministry available through online blogs than in all the books on the subject combined. I follow as many college ministries on Twitter as I can find. I “favorite” and “share” and “repost” the content that I find helpful and relevant for my context.

7. Be a mentor. I’ve been on the receiving end of so much good experience and information that I now take even greater joy in passing along what I’ve learned, for whatever it’s worth to whomever wants to learn. I’m getting old, so people often ask me how we do things where I work. I’m on the receiving end of phone interviews and have grown to enjoy blogging about things I wish I’d known 10 or 20 years ago. If you keep track of what you’re learning, you’re better able to give it away when the time comes.

And here’s the thing … all of these practices are free, or nearly free. All of these forms of peer review can be applied to work in any organization in ministry, higher education, non-profit management, or business. All of them require you to know the people who do what you do, which you should anyway. All of these ideas put you in touch with practical information about work in the trenches, on the front lines. All these ideas allow you to be both a teacher and a learner. Learn from the best. Learn from their successes and failures. Learn from people both older and younger than you. Keep learning and getting better at what you do and you won’t get burned-out or bored.

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